Twenty-Four Hours a Day - 1948 Daytona Beach 1st Printing

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Twenty-Four Hours a Day - 1948 Daytona Beach 1st Printing


This is a very first printing of the Twenty-Four Hour a Day book by Richmond Walker. This is an original printing made by Richmond Walker in Daytona Beach, FL before Hazelden started printing the book in the 1950’s. Read the below excerpt from an article about the book:

 

TWENTY-FOUR HOURS A DAY
Price $1.50
Twenty-Four Hours A Day
P. O. Box 2170
Daytona Beach, Florida

 

“Rich (who had gotten sober in May 1942) first assembled the material on small cards which he carried around with him to use in his own prayer and meditation. But in 1948, members of the A.A. groups in Daytona Beach, Florida, persuaded him to have this material printed in book form, so the rest of them could use it too. He had some copies printed, and demand for the book quickly began to spread outside of the Daytona Beach area. Rich distributed them from his basement: A.A. members would write him asking for copies, and he would wrap them and mail them out. Past Delegate Bob P. (Goshen, Indiana) told me that Wesley Parrish, an A.A. member in Daytona Beach, was a County Commissioner and obtained the use of the county printing press to run these copies off. The county was paid for the printing, but this arrangement may have made it easier to print small batches relatively inexpensively. I was told that Parrish (whom Bob P. had met in the course of his A.A. activities) had come from Georgia down into Florida as a housing contractor.”

FURTHER COPIES OF THIS BOOK MAY
BE HAD AT $1.50 APIECE
BY WRITING TO:

TWENTY-FOUR HOURS A DAY
P.O. BOX 2170
DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA

“In later printings Rich added, at the end of the book, "Compiled by a member of the Group at Daytona Beach, Fla." As use of the little book began to spread rapidly across the United States, people in other parts of the country wanted to know where it came from. Rich, who always acted with the greatest humility, refused even to put his first name and last initial on the book, but simply indicated what A.A. group he belonged to. He wanted absolutely no personal fame, glory, or personal profit from the book. David W., the Florida A.A. archivist, says that if at some points the book distribution earned a slight profit, Rich immediately donated all of it to A.A.”

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The book is in very good condition. There is some splitting starting to the binding at page 3 and at the back of the book. There is no writing or markings inside the book. Please view all of the photos for the conditions.

 


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